Entertainment & Media

The Business of Collaboration

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.” – Helen Keller Business is often fueled by healthy competition. The desire to succeed in our respective industries is what drives success. We create a business plan and marketing campaign based on the marketplace as well as what our competitors are doing. All […]

“Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.”
– Helen Keller
Business is often fueled by healthy competition. The desire to succeed in our respective industries is what drives success. We create a business plan and marketing campaign based on the marketplace as well as what our competitors are doing. All of this can lead to a robust and thriving local economy and top-notch service offerings. It’s a very good thing for our community, but at what expense?
Collaboration has long been celebrated and encouraged in the non-profit sector. We love the idea of community programs sharing resources and ideas that work toward the same common goals. However, the concept of collaboration outside of the non-profit world if often met with trepidation. Why would you work with your competition?
The real question is, why wouldn’t you? Business collaboration allows you to learn from your peers, take on a greater scope of work, service your clients more fully, and create something bigger than yourself. Amazing mentorship and often friendship is born from working together with others in your field. While it can feel like a calculated risk, putting yourself and your business in the room with others in your industry can also fuel ideas and best practices.
Take Mothers, the master collaborators. Calling upon each other to help with carpools, class parties, field trips, and play dates. Moms regularly share best practices, seek advice from one another, and lend a helping hand anytime one is needed. This makes us ALL better. In fact, I think you would be hard-pressed to find a Mom who doesn’t agree that collaboration with her fellow Moms is the key to her success.
As my business grew, I knew that finding other similar businesses and professionals to help me on this journey was critical to our success. Engaging with other video and digital content professionals, learning about their processes, sharing ideas, and mentoring each other on the industry, challenges us to improve our skills and encourages us to find unique ways to work together. This collaborative approach to work resonated with everyone we spoke with, and we quickly realized there was a need to foster this concept, especially among women. And so, #410Collaborative was born.
We are founded on the common goal of collaboration being at the core of everything we do. We are made up of four female business owners and work with countless others who share our vision. We offer monthly seminars hosted by women designed to uplift, enlighten, and encourage anyone who attends. Finally, we are a place where you can enjoy a creative workspace, share ideas freely, or just stop in to take a few minutes to be mindful and recharge. We are truly grateful for the opportunities we have been given to collaborate and want to share those experiences with everyone we meet!

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IronPigs Baseball

A Decade of Hog Heaven “If you build it, they will come” is a paraphrase of one of the most famous baseball movie lines of all-time. This fairy tale also proved true for Allentown in 2008, when the Lehigh Valley received its Field of Dreams in the form of Coca-Cola Park – home of the […]

A Decade of Hog Heaven

“If you build it, they will come” is a paraphrase of one of the most famous baseball movie lines of all-time. This fairy tale also proved true for Allentown in 2008, when the Lehigh Valley received its Field of Dreams in the form of Coca-Cola Park – home of the IronPigs.
After going 47 years without affiliated Minor League Baseball, the Valley became home to the Philadelphia Phillies’ Triple-A affiliate for the 2008 season. Since that time, there’s not a minor league team in the nation that has drawn more fans.

Created with the motto of providing affordable family entertainment, the IronPigs have seen more than six million fans pass through the turnstiles at Bacon, USA, since inception. Some arrive excited to catch a glimpse of baseball’s top prospects and the future of their beloved Phillies. Many more come out looking for a fun way to spend an evening with family and friends.

Coca-Cola Park has also been a tremendous asset to the business community. Over 500 local businesses have found success strategically aligning with the IronPigs, whether to market their brand and products, to entertain prospects and clients or to reward employees.

All fans are treated to a nine-inning vacation.

“We are constantly challenging ourselves to be both unique and innovative,” said President/General Manager Kurt Landes. “Whether it’s a new feature at the stadium, a special promotion or a giveaway, we take pride in offering a memorable experience unlike any other in the Valley. At the home of the IronPigs, the sky’s the limit!”
And the proof is in the pork.

Although Coca-Cola Park is only ten years old, the IronPigs have already spent millions in reinvestment projects to offer a variety of additional group hospitality areas and one-of-a-kind seating options. Prior to this past season, they installed a brand-new video system that features the largest HD display in Minor League Baseball.

Between caps, T-shirts, bobbleheads and other novelties, no team in the minors schedules more giveaway nights – or postgame fireworks shows — than the IronPigs. The organization has also been the first in the country to provide interactive fan experiences such as a social media cave and a urinal video game system. It also remains the first and only to welcome fans with bubbles upon entering through the main gates.

The IronPigs commitment to the fan experience extends to their ever-evolving concessions menu. Fans are invited to “pig out” with unique signature items – many of which are pork inspired. There are options as zany as the Sweet & Sassy (BBQ pulled pork served on a glazed donut roll topped with bacon and candied jalapeños) to others that are as simply delightful as a quarter-pound slice of candied bacon on a skewer. No matter what you are hankering, you can always add bacon to any food item at Bacon, USA (naturally).

On the subject of pork, the nightly Pork Race is perhaps the most anticipated moment of every game. While players like Pedro Martinez, Maikel Franco Freddy Galvis, and Rhys Hoskins have all donned an IronPigs uniform, no quartet has been more popular than mascots Chris P. Bacon, Diggity, Barbie-Q, and Hambone.

IronPigs fans have now gone hog wild for a full decade, but nobody said it would be easy.
After two failed independent franchises (professional teams not affiliated with Major League Baseball) in the prior decade, there were many in the community that didn’t think there would be enough support to make the IronPigs a successful venture.

But with a state-of-the-art facility — completed at $50 M in 2008 — and the vision of principle owners Joe Finley and Craig Stein, the IronPigs were an instant success. Despite owning the worst record in the International League in their inaugural season, the IronPigs averaged 8,479 fans in 71 home games – selling out a remarkable 49 times.

Coca-Cola Park and the IronPigs aren’t just about baseball. The organization holds countess special events at the facility throughout the year, from shindigs like the Wine and Cider Festival and the Bacon and Brew Bash to private functions like weddings and holiday parties. Coca-Cola Park was designed to be a 365-days-per-year venue.

The franchise is also active in its support of the community through IronPigs Charities, which was created to provide educational and recreational opportunities for Lehigh Valley youth. Since its inception in 2007, IronPigs Charities has distributed more than $1 M to local non-profit organizations.

After celebrating their 10-year anniversary this past season, the IronPigs now look forward to another riveting decade at their Field of Dreams… or perhaps more appropriately, Hog Heaven.

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Three Tech Tools that Will Take your Video to the Next Level

Have you ever watched a film, music video or TV show and noticed all the little things? Do you want to stand high above all those iPhone videos dominating social media today?  Creating a video that captivates your business audience is a balance between good storytelling and good visuals.  There are a few tech tools […]

Have you ever watched a film, music video or TV show and noticed all the little things? Do you want to stand high above all those iPhone videos dominating social media today?  Creating a video that captivates your business audience is a balance between good storytelling and good visuals.  There are a few tech tools that can help your video stand out in what is fast becoming a crowded field.
Aerial photography creates buzz and helps you rise high, literally.  Whether it’s a simple flyover that shows your physical office or a hovering shot of your storefront, it’s visually interesting.  We’ve even used a drone to hover over a giant Mack dump truck coming into the shop for repairs.  Drones offer a vantage point you can’t get from a tall ladder.  It’s a “bird’s eye view” of your business.  Only a few years ago, you had to pay for a high-priced helicopter to get those amazing shots (admittedly, we still do for certain things).   Eventually, TV stations purchased or leased helicopters to get views they simply couldn’t get from the ground.  Then the drones came and conquered!
Technically, a “drone” refers to any unmanned aerial vehicle that can be operated from the ground.  Ours navigates with the help of a GPS tracking system.  The one we use is called a Phantom and boasts an onboard 4K camera.  Video companies like ours need a license from the Federal Aviation Administration to fly it and sell our video for profit.  I had to take what amounts to a private pilot license exam to allow me to fly legally.  More and more companies in the Lehigh Valley are getting this remote pilot license (called a Part 107). Make sure you ask your video company if they have one before they fly on your behalf.
DJI makes the drone we fly.  They also created another smooth moving technology we love, their handheld Osmo.  Think about it for a minute, have you ever watched a movie where there is a shot of people walking and talking and it’s perfectly steady and smooth? Big movies use railroad-like tracks that allow the camera to roll smoothly while the subjects move.  A jib, with a camera that can move up and down, works too.   Our DJI Osmo handheld gimbal and camera allows me to walk right along with the action, while the gimbal corrects for my movements.  The Osmo makes it possible to capture motion without blur or bumps in the road.
Speaking of bumps in the road, there’s nothing better than capturing live action on a GoPro.  The small, digital point-of-view cameras have been the favorites of action seekers for years. It was created by a surfer, turned billionaire, who wanted to share his water-loving exploits with his friends.  A GoPro can be mounted to a helmet or handle bar of a bike (among other places), to get great footage.  We use our GoPro to capture action video in our tourism videos.  They’re also fantastic gadgets to capture time lapse footage.  We used one to capture the Good Friday crowd at Josh Early Candies (the busiest day of their year), and the results were spectacular.
While “a picture is worth a thousand words” may sound like a tired cliché, in the case of marketing, the concept is still very true.  Putting a high-tech spin on your business videos will help separate you from the rest.

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Collaboration

I went to the doctor a few weeks ago for some pain in my lower back. After explaining my situation and answering all his questions, he recommended some blood work and possibly an ultrasound to check for kidney stones. I told him that after 43 years, I think I know what’s wrong. After all, it […]

I went to the doctor a few weeks ago for some pain in my lower back. After explaining my situation and answering all his questions, he recommended some blood work and possibly an ultrasound to check for kidney stones. I told him that after 43 years, I think I know what’s wrong. After all, it is my body, and I’ve had this discomfort before. He went on to explain why the tests were important so we can effectively diagnose the issue and make sure the treatment is the right one. I’m not a fan of medical testing, so I decided against it and left.

This past weekend, I ate out for dinner at a local restaurant. After ordering my steak, I wandered back into the kitchen to supervise the chef. I told him when to turn it over on the grill, what seasoning to add and when it was done. I knew all of this from a YouTube video I watched on how to cook the best steak.

Then most recently, I took my car in for service. There was a banging noise coming from the left front and a subtle shudder in the wheels. I knew something wasn’t right. The service tech looked at it and told me I have one tire that’s really worn and needs replacing, but suggested I get at least get two tires so he can rotate and balance all four wheels for me. I wasn’t sure I really needed a second tire. He told me the banging noise under the hood was actually incorrect spark plugs. “It happens,” he said. “You can have deposit buildup in the chamber is causing the knock you hear.” After some thought, I decided on one tire and handled the noise by using higher octane gas. I’m sure that will fix it. It’s my car, after all.

All three of these scenarios should sound ridiculous to you. Why on earth would I not follow the advice of a medical professional, an experienced chef or a certified mechanic? Considering the fact that I am not an expert in medicine, culinary arts or automotive engineering, it would be silly for me to ignore them and do it my own way.

Yet this consistently happens in marketing and advertising.  I experience it, I’ve witnessed it, and I’ve heard about this very thing from countless colleagues in the field.  We often feel handcuffed in the process by personal preferences, decision-by-committee, and uneducated perspectives. The struggle is real.  There are too many conversations that are just about the rate, often with apples-to-oranges comparisons.  Price doesn’t always equal value.

What’s missing?

Collaboration. Brilliant brand stories can easily get lost in the shuffle, miss the mark and fade into the background, drowned out by today’s noisy and cluttered media marketplace.  Instead, try letting an expert in media or marketing help you, the expert in your business, tell a unique brand story.  Each party brings craft and strategy to the table.  Craft is the collection of knowledge, experience, and talent. It can’t be a one-sided relationship. They never last… just like real life.

“Craft is fascinating. A Taxi driver talking about taxi driving is very, very interesting,” says James Lipton, Writer and Executive Producer of Inside the Actors Studio.  You’d be amazed at what you can learn by listening to someone talk about their craft.  That goes for both parties.

When we approach this with the idea that learning from each other is how the best results are possible, collaboration can truly flourish, better stories are told, and the results will follow.

My recommendation is to ask some questions to your marketing partners. There are many talented and capable media professionals out there who can assist you with this topic. Take the time to have some conversation with them about your business and share your craft.  Many of us are more than just media sales reps.  There are decades of experience and knowledge available to you, across multiple media platforms, and we all have a desire to help you succeed.

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Communications 101

Making your Message the Best it Can Be I’ve recently had the pleasure of being a media trainer at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.  It was the world’s first collegiate business school and is arguably the best MBA program in the country.  These students are some of the brightest and most ambitious […]

Making your Message the Best it Can Be

I’ve recently had the pleasure of being a media trainer at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.  It was the world’s first collegiate business school and is arguably the best MBA program in the country.  These students are some of the brightest and most ambitious business minds I’ve ever encountered.  They intrinsically know why making your message the best it can be, matters at all levels of business. Thus, all Wharton MBA students, even those in the Executive Level program, must take a management communication course. For some, it comes naturally.  For others, it’s a learned skill. We test their speech making skills, both with and without a teleprompter, then grill them on questions they could potentially get from reporters.  It’s always entertaining and enlightening.

Good leaders need to be confident public speakers and know the essentials of persuasive speech.  How you organize and deliver a presentation to your peer’s matters. Delivering a speech at a conference matters. How you defend your views matter. An interview with a reporter matters.
A reporter wants your opinion on the topic you’ve been asked to talk about, but you have to remember it’s a chance to communicate with the audience and let them hear your expertise.  It’s an opportunity to shine and let your organization shine. You’re talking to more than just the reporter holding the microphone or the reporter’s notebook.

I’ve interviewed thousands of business owners, doctors, and other professionals during my years in television. After I make you say your name and spell it for me, my first question is almost always the same: “Tell me about your job or your company.”

Often, I get a regurgitation of the company mission statement.  Something like:

“(Company Name) is one of the leading companies in the Lehigh Valley making high-quality (product) in an affordable and sustainable manner.”
The short, sound bite friendly answer is good time-wise but it could have been better if you’d given me an animated, example filled answer like:

“Whenever you buy (competitor’s product), you know how they always seem to cost too much and break within weeks of opening the box? My company (name) makes (product) that aren’t going to break after you open the package – we guarantee it – and we’ve even figured out a way to make a high-quality (product) affordable and environmentally-friendly.”
Both are practiced responses, but the second is far more engaging.

Engagement is the key to being asked to be a regular TV interview subject or guest speaker.

Here are my top 5 tips for business communication:

1 Have a clear message.  Get to the point!  Use examples that back up your position.

2 Don’t speak above your audience.  Leave the technical jargon for your next professional meeting.

3 Speak to your audience, not an individual reporter.  By avoiding names, it’s clear that you’re addressing the larger audience.  You want your message to be broadly accepted. Don’t thank someone for their question or compliment them and say “that’s a good question.”  Most reporters are practiced pros.  Their questions are usually good. If you compliment one, you have to compliment them all!

4 Be prepared for tough questions.  As mentioned, reporters are pros. They aren’t there to grill you, but they should ask tough questions.   Address the inquiry and bring it back to your message.  Never say “No comment.”  It’s okay to say, “I don’t know the answer to that” and then bridge it back to what you want to talk about. No comment just triggers your audience to think you’re guilty of something. Say things like “looking at the big picture” or “what I do know.” It allows you to bridge back to where you started to rephrase and repeat your major points.

5 Work on your nerves.  Practice your talking points, so you don’t find yourself “umming” and “ahhing” throughout your presentation.  Pause when you need to make a point.  It’s great for pacing and lets your brain catch up.  Smile in appropriate places. Take it slow and communicate your message with authority and ease. Breathe!

Communication is one of the most basics things we do in business…and in life.  Becoming a good communicator takes practice.  It’s a skill to nurture.  Don’t overlook how practice can make perfect.

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Tell Me a Story

As a follow-up to last issue’s column called Adverpanicking©, I want to talk more about how important storytelling is to your brand.  Response to advertising comes in two basic forms: intellect and emotion.  The analytic position will often say something like, “Reach the right people to increase your advertising effectiveness.”  While that may be true, […]

As a follow-up to last issue’s column called Adverpanicking©, I want to talk more about how important storytelling is to your brand.  Response to advertising comes in two basic forms: intellect and emotion.  The analytic position will often say something like, “Reach the right people to increase your advertising effectiveness.”  While that may be true, to a certain extent, it’s not what ultimately creates a response.  My guess is you’ve likely been reaching the right people all along, but your message just isn’t connecting.

It’s not who you reach; it’s what you say that matters.  Make it count.

If mediocrity is your goal, by all means, blend in.

When an ad campaign fails, it’s easy to blame the radio station for “having the wrong listeners,” the newspaper for “placing it on the wrong page,” or the outdoor company for “the wrong locations.”  Don’t worry, and it’s the natural tendency.  As I’ve said before, the medium is neutral when you have the right message, coupled with great design…so Forget Reach, Think Speech.

Now before all the analysts and strategists in the media community lose their collective minds, I’m not suggesting you shouldn’t do your homework.  Data is important and helpful to the process, but that’s not what consumers see.

The greatest data in the world won’t save bad messaging and poor design.

Some business owners get frustrated with advertising because they too want to make it a science.  They often judge effectiveness incorrectly and have the wrong expectations.  Scientific analysis has given the world many wonderful things, but when it comes to advertising, leave the heavy science out of it.  It’s not a scientific process, and it can’t be explained that way.  Considering that the average consumer is exposed to approximately 5,000 messages each day, I’d say there are plenty of opportunities to reach someone, so let’s focus on how to grab and keep their attention.

Businesses, ask yourself this – Why do you exist? Why should people care? How do they see themselves in your story? The answers to those questions will never be found in a spreadsheet.

Why stories, you ask? Because we’re surrounded by, and consume them in every aspect of our lives. Music, Movies, Books, Vacations, Education, Social Media…you get the idea. From early cave paintings to the latest virtual reality device, we live and experience story telling.

Why should your brand be any different? I love this quote from Seth Godin –

“Marketing is no longer about the stuff that you make, but about the stories you tell.”

Remember from last time – what do you really sell?  Why should it matter? Now go tell a story with the consumer as the main character.

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Adverpanicking

Adverpanicking©

I’m going to muddy the waters here. This will sound like a combination of whining and criticism, wrapped up in an angry rant.  It’s not.  It is, however, an “open your mouth and take this medicine” article designed to provoke thought and challenge your status quo – a sincere plea to consider something different. The […]

I’m going to muddy the waters here. This will sound like a combination of whining and criticism, wrapped up in an angry rant.  It’s not.  It is, however, an “open your mouth and take this medicine” article designed to provoke thought and challenge your status quo – a sincere plea to consider something different.

The question I want you to ask yourself is, “Who cares?”

(We’ll come back to this later)

I’m often amazed at what passes for advertising these days.  The job of advertising goes far beyond circulating information. When done well, it’s an ongoing dialog with your customers as well as an invitation to attract new ones and build relationships. Cramming ads with hours, address, years in business, directions, low-quality images, a bunch of vendor logos and other irrelevant information, is a term I call Adverpanicking©
Day after day, week after week, there it is, on full display. The ads are screaming at me from every direction to try this new service, act now, today only, come to our show, eat here because, family owned since, blah, blah, blah…boring and forgettable.
They all suffer from the same problem – they answer questions no one is asking.  Bad advertising is about the business, and good advertising is about the customer. David Ogilvy once said, “You can’t bore people into buying your product.”

I’ve heard over the years, that advertising is supposed to sell products and drive business.  This is true! However, that’s an outcome, not the basis of messaging or design.  Marketing that focuses solely on the end result is a short-term strategy. It doesn’t build loyalty or a relationship to your brand.  It will sell some product, but as soon as a better price is found or the attention of the consumer is diverted elsewhere, you’ll likely lose them.

Instead, try approaching your advertising from the consumer’s point of view.  Sell the solution to a problem or engage the audience in a story about why your business should matter to them.  Be simple in your approach – less is always more.  And don’t tell me you have no time or money to brand, that’s nonsense and if ignored, seriously detrimental to your company’s future.

“Businesses need to understand what they are selling if they hope to create ad messages that will reach the intended audience,” said William Childs, Director of Marketing & Communications at Trifecta Technologies. “Harley-Davidson does not sell motorcycles; they sell freedom. Jack Daniels does not sell whiskey; they sell tradition.  If I owned a mattress store, I wouldn’t sell mattresses. I would sell a good night’s sleep.” added Childs
There are two sides to this issue – those working in the field of marketing & advertising and the clients we partner with in this endeavor.

To my fellow colleagues in the business – fight hard for the good ideas, challenge your clients to disrupt the status quo and tell them what they need to hear, not just what they want to hear.  I know that our toughest task can often be pushing customers into the unknown and beyond their comfort zones.  When your motive is pure, and you truly care about their business, it’s worth it.

To the customers – If you’ve never taken an honest look at who you truly are or what you really sell, now is the time.  If it keeps you up at night thinking, consider it progress.  There are numerous professionals out there full of knowledge and ideas. Many of us love thinking about your business and creating stories to push your brand forward.
I ask again, “Who cares?”  That’s the question that needs to be answered.  Give your audience a reason to care.  Hell, make them angry if you have to, at least you’ll get a response.  Donny Deutsch said, “Better to have 35% of the people charged up about you and the rest hate you than to have 100% not care.”  That’s powerful stuff.  There’s more than enough mediocrity going around, and no one has ever done anything remarkable by blending in.

How do you start? Have a conversation and ask some questions.  I, for one, am always open to a cup of Joe and the sharing of ideas.

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How to Design a Successful Out of Town Conference

Planning an out of town conference does not need to be stressful when you are working with the expert staff of innovative professionals at Mohegan Sun Pocono. While a conference at a casino may seem unconventional, Mohegan Sun Pocono is a “one-stop shop” that offers meeting organizers the ability to create tailor-made experiences. Mohegan Sun […]

Planning an out of town conference does not need to be stressful when you are working with the expert staff of innovative professionals at Mohegan Sun Pocono. While a conference at a casino may seem unconventional, Mohegan Sun Pocono is a “one-stop shop” that offers meeting organizers the ability to create tailor-made experiences.

Mohegan Sun Pocono meets every objective and fits every budget, while allowing attendees to have experiences they won’t soon forget.

“At Mohegan Sun Pocono our meeting expectations are as high as yours. We host over 600 meetings and conferences every year,” said Mike Slivka, Director of Sales and Catering. “We work with Association and Corporate meeting organizers from all over the country to ensure that every detail is handled and that the event runs smoothly so when everyone is onsite they can have a productive meeting and then enjoy all our property has to offer.”

Slivka’s advice to meeting organizers outside the area is simple. “Disclose your budget and we will help you maximize it. When we have that information early on in the process, we can customize your experience with greater success all around.”

Slivka adds, “We love to be creative, and our clients love it too. Once you secure the date, talk to our food and beverage team early in the process and let us know your goals and objectives and feel free to send us some photos. The more information we have, the better we can design an event that is perfect for your organization; we can have some fun with it too, and make it uniquely yours.”

Finally Slivka states “Don’t be afraid to ask questions. Call or email any time and we are happy to talk things through with you, no matter where you’re located. At Mohegan Sun Pocono, unparalleled service is an expectation, not an exception. We are here for you, from that first phone call or email until the event is complete. We aren’t satisfied until you are.”

Whether it’s a traditional meeting for 10 to 1,600 inside Mohegan Sun Pocono’s 20,000 square-foot Convention Center, its multiple, flexible and strikingly-designed individual meeting rooms, a unique meeting space inside Timbers Buffet, Pacers Clubhouse, Seasons Ballroom overlooking the track or in the center of it all at Center Bar; Mohegan Sun Pocono is dedicated to make your meeting a memorable and successful one.

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billboard-advertising-is-not-limited-to-roadways

Billboard advertising is not limited to roadways anymore…

Living and working in the Lehigh Valley you cannot help but notice a billboard on Route 22, you can probably even remember some of your favorite ads.   What most people do not realize is how powerful and economical billboard advertising can be for any business or organization in the Lehigh Valley. Since this area is […]

Living and working in the Lehigh Valley you cannot help but notice a billboard on Route 22, you can probably even remember some of your favorite ads.   What most people do not realize is how powerful and economical billboard advertising can be for any business or organization in the Lehigh Valley.

Since this area is known for the many towns and roads that connect them, Out of Home Advertising (OOH) has a higher than average ability to impact local consumers throughout the course of day with a high level of efficiency and results.

In a market that is designated as part of the Philadelphia DMA (designated market area) coupled with the ever-increasing media fragmentation, OOH in the Lehigh Valley is more relevant and more powerful than ever.  OOH reaches people no matter how they consume their media; it makes them stop, notice and buy.  No other advertising format is more ever-present, or more creatively versatile.

In addition, Out of Home is achieving even a greater return on investment by triggering consumers to reach for their mobile devices to learn more about a product or service that they just saw on a billboard.  People always have their mobile device, PLUS, they spend about 70% of their waking hours away from home exposing them to OOH ads more than ever.  This coupling of OOH and online / mobile advertising has proven to be one of the most powerful combinations in today’s advertising arsenal.

OOH continues to be a core part of social media and mobile strategies and we will see more and more campaigns with ooh as the centerpiece.  Coca-Cola launched an integrated digital campaign in Times Square as an extension of its hugely successful “Share a Coke” campaign, incorporating large digital billboards, and Google search data, mobile and socially activated call to action.

This successful combination of billboards and on-line / mobile advertising has provided the foundation for the launch of Outdoor Extended from Adams Outdoor Advertising… extending an advertisers reach from on the road to on line.

This Outdoor Extended program delivers 4 key programming tactics that deliver your outdoor message in ads targeted to your customers by where they live, who they are, what they do and what they read and engage with on the internet.

To learn more you can contact Adams Outdoor Advertising at 610.266.9461

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dynamic-marketing

Dynamic Marketing

Podcasting As A Business Tool Business is not complicated. It really isn’t. However, the world we live in is very complicated and extremely noisy. You could offer the greatest product or service, yet if your distribution channels or marketing is weak or outdated you will not prosper. If you’ve achieved a lot or even a […]

Podcasting As A Business Tool

Business is not complicated. It really isn’t. However, the world we live in is very complicated and extremely noisy. You could offer the greatest product or service, yet if your distribution channels or marketing is weak or outdated you will not prosper. If you’ve achieved a lot or even a modicum of brand visibility that’s great; however, that’s not enough these days. It’s likely your competitors have similar presences in the marketplace, so it comes down to whom consumers like the most and trust the most. Trust however, is becoming harder to earn. Online reviews and word-of-mouth referrals do not have the same clout they did from even a few years ago. This is partly because too often the digital presence of a business doesn’t coincide with its real-world version. How many times have you had high hopes of something but the experience didn’t live up to the expectation? Savvy consumers realize it’s easy to conjure up an avatar, fake “reviews,” and manipulate posts on Facebook and other social media.

Enter podcasting with its dynamic nature. Your message — your voice — not text you write or images you post but rather your actual voice delivering your message is in consumers’ heads during some of the most private, impressionable moments of their day. Whereas anyone can get a slick website or employ a graphic designer so on the surface they look professional because podcasting “separates the boys from the men.” It will be immediately obvious if you don’t know what you’re talking about on a podcast. This works the other way, too. For those that paid their dues, the experts in their field let the world hear you! You know your stuff. People will realize this through your podcast. Podcasting can enhance your brand more effectively than any other marketing tool.

Podcasts are the best format for mobile, readily being consumed on the go. The information is portable, easy to share, and on-demand. Consumers decide when and where they listen. Open dialogues and roundtable discussions create a sense of community that your audience will appreciate when listening to your podcast.

Podcasting is a more personal way of marketing. It’s a way to become intimate with your existing or potential customers because they select your show. They chose you. Out of all of your “competition” your audience wants to hear you. You are essentially speaking to one person at a time who has invited you into their space. It’s the epitome of the book The Thank You Economy by Gary Vaynerchuk. Incidentally, another of that book’s main principles is, “If you’re not passionate enough about what your company does to find fuel for conversations every day, for hours on end, with as many people as possible, maybe you’re in the wrong business.” Are you starting to see why a podcast could be the greatest vehicle to tell your story, to set you apart in your field, to elevate your credibility, and/or to increase awareness of your brand?​

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